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Painting Your Piano- Step by Step Tutorial

Posted by huntersofhappiness

Chalk Paint Piano

I painted my piano for the first time about 4 years ago with chalk paint. I have been so happy with how it’s held up all these years! But, I was ready for a color change so I painted it again! Here are all the steps I took to get a beautiful professional looking finish when painting your piano!

 

PRODUCTS-

I used BB FROSCH paint transformer and Sherwin Williams ProClassic trim paint in the color Egret White (It has a slight grey to it. Very pretty!). The paint transformer turns any paint into chalk paint.  I wanted a matte finish so I got the paint in satin finish.

I used THIS paintbrush but any medium stiffness nylon paintbrush will do (I haven’t tried using a roller but you could give it a try!) Also, a small square tip craft brush to get in all the small spaces!

Painters Tape and a Drop Cloth

I used BB FROSCH clear wax and an old white T-shirt

 

Step 1- Prepare the Surface

One of the things I love about BB Frosch paint transformer/chalk paint is that sanding is not usually needed! Woohoo! It is important to prep the surface though. For wood or an already painted surface, a good clean with a lint-free rag will do! Since I had painted and waxed my piano previously, I needed to clean the wax off. I used Mineral Spirits and a rag to get off as much of the wax as I could!

Step 2- Tape and drop cloth

Tape off any areas of the piano you don’t want paint, remove any knobs or stands that you can, lay a drop cloth on the ground surrounding your piano.

Step 3- Mix the paint

Mix 2 Tablespoons BB Frosch paint transformer with 1 Tablespoon Water to create a donut glaze consistency mixture. Then mix that with 1 cup of your paint and you’re ready to go!

Step 4- Paint!

Use long, thin strokes to cover the piece. It is better for the paint to be watery than thick and the paint will thicken as you go so if you need to mix in a little water now and then it’s ok! The first coat should be thin and as smooth as possible. Only go back over the paint right after you’ve laid it. If you come back even a few minutes after laying it and go over it, it will clump. The first layer is like a crumb coat on a cake. It lays a good foundation but won’t look terribly pretty. You’ll be able to see the paint or wood underneath.

Use a small square tip craft brush to get in all the tight small spaces.

You’ll need 1-2 more coats of paint same as the first. Thin layers, long strokes. I repainted layers after 2 hours and it worked great!

Step 5 -Wax

After 24 hours of letting your paint coats dry, it’s time to wax! I used the BB Frosch clear wax and I’m in love with it. It’s the best wax I’ve ever used. I Used one of Scott’s old white cotton T-shirts, picked up some wax, and rubbed it into the paint. I like to rub the wax in along the same lines I stroked the paintbrushes. I go off of feel with the wax to make sure I have good coverage. It should feel tacky but not clumpy (If it’s clumpy or too thick use the cotton T to rub off some wax).  Don’t touch the wax and let it dry for 24 hours. It will cure hard and smooth.

For those asking, the purpose of the wax is a sealer or a protectant. Think of the final “top coat” of nail polish. You could leave the paint without it but it would be more likely to chip or peel and won’t last as long.

Chalk Paint Piano

Once the Wax has dried you’re DONE! That’s it!

Why Use Chalk Paint?

I got a lot of questions on my Instagram about why I used chalk paint, so here are my reasons

  • No sanding. Chalk paint is excellent at adhering to wood and painted surfaces. No need to sand! This saves SO much time!
  • Self Leveling. Chalk paint is self-leveling which means that as it dries stroke lines disappear! It gives an incredibly smooth, spray-painted look without all the work!
  • Coverage. Chalk paint takes less paint to cover more! It’s really incredible! I used about 2 1/2 Cups of paint to paint the whole piano!
  • Matte Finish. Chalk paint gives a matte modern finish. I know you usually think Farmhouse and distressing when you think of chalk paint, but that’s only the case if you want it to be!

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